Coronavirus: Long fingernails is one of the fastest spreaders of COVID-19 warns nurse |

Lives have drastically changed during these difficult times. But looking at the positives of the COVID-19 effect is that many people are operating much better hygiene practices. It’s common knowledge now that hand washing is imperative but now a nurse has issued a new warning and anyone who has long fingernails could be putting themselves at great risk.

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A nurse said that long nails can be one of the fastest spreaders of coronavirus due to their ability to harbour germs, bacteria and even the virus underneath.

The Australian health worker advised the best practice for good hygiene should be to trim your fingernails and keep them short.

To test if your nails are short enough, she recommended pressing the tip of the finger against the skin.

If you can feel the nails but not the flesh of the finger, the mails are too long and should be cut in order to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

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Coronavirus: Nurse offers new warning

Coronavirus: A nurse offers a new warning which could significantly increase risk of a spread (Image: Getty Images)

Writing on Facebook, she said: “Among all the hand-washing instructions and the fun 20-second song suggestions, I haven’t seen anyone note that it is impossible to wash your hands properly if your fingernails are long.

“If you can’t put your fingernails straight down against the other palm without your nails adding too much distance to do it, you cannot wash under your fingernails properly unless you use a nail brush every time.”

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Along with long fingernails being a precursor to the spread of Covid-19, biting your nails has also been advised against. 

Biting nails could seriously increase a person’s risk of contracting coronavirus, according to an allergy and infectious diseases specialist.

Purvi Parikh, from New York University’s Langone Medical Center issued this warning to those who continually bite their nails.

Coronavirus: Long fingernails

Coronavirus: Having long fingernails increases the risk of spreading Covid-19 (Image: Getty Images)

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Purvi spoke to The Cut and said: “Bacteria, viruses, dirt and debris can collect under the nails and can then be transferred to your mouth if you bite your nails.

“Every time you touch your face especially your mouth, nose and eyes, you’re transferring all of those germs. And you can get sick.

“The infectious disease specialist added that germs going into the mouth is the easiest way you can contract any infection.”  

Health workers stress the importance of practicing good hygiene during these troubling times. The nurse added: “Please, during this global emergency, keep your nails short.”

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Coronavirus: Biting fingernails

Coronavirus: Biting your fingernails is another warning (Image: Getty Images)

Her warning prompted many others to comment on her post and said that keeping nails short is common and standard practice for medical professionals who are around bacteria much more than others.

Tips were also shared on the post saying that there can be germs even in nail polish and advised everyone to keep their nails short and clean. One person added: “The same is true of engagement rings and wedding bands.”