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Cancer in the oldest old: The fastest growing age group in the US

A new report looks at cancer in adults 85 and older and finds incidence and mortality trends are generally similar to those in people 65 to 84, but screening is unexpectedly high and survival is poorer. The report appears in

Poor pneumonia outcomes tied to overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics

Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics is associated with increased mortality and other poor outcomes in adults admitted for community-onset pneumonia, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of the European Respiratory Journal. Brandon J. Webb, M.D., from the

Asbestosis toxicity study identifies potential of novel mineral treatment

Asbestos-related cancers include lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma (MM) for which there is no cure. Most patients with MM die within two years of diagnosis and despite the banning of asbestos in many countries MM related deaths are predicted to

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields activate immune cells

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) produce strong electrical effects by focusing a high powered electrical pulse over a very short period of time. They are attracting attention as a method of physically stimulating matter in various fields, particularly in the

Nearly 3 in 10 Philadelphians know someone who's died from opioid use, Pew survey finds

In a stark illustration of the depths of Philadelphia’s opioid crisis, a new survey of city residents found that nearly a third—29% – know someone who has died from opioid use. The survey, conducted by the Pew Charitable Trusts among

Transport by mobile stroke units get patients quicker treatment than ambulance

Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute. Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) recently published new findings in Stroke that show

Eating more plant-based foods may be linked to better heart health

Eating mostly plant-based foods and fewer animal-based foods may be linked to better heart health and a lower risk of dying from a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular disease according to new research published in the Journal of the

Food insecurity common across US higher education campuses

Many university and college students across the U.S. report lacking access to a reliable supply of nutritious food, a concept known as food insecurity, which can affect their ability to learn, according to research presented at the annual convention of

Stomach bloating: Getting the required amount of sleep will help with cramps and bloating |

Stomach bloating is when the belly feels swollen after eating and is usually caused by excess gas production or disturbances in the movement of the muscles of the digestive system. Stomach bloating can often cause an uncomfortable pain and can

Pollen season: Can hay fever cause tight chest? Is a sore throat a symptom? |

Around one in five Brits are affected by seasonal allergic rhinitis, also known as hayfever. Pollen season, triggering hayfever, has collided with the coronavirus pandemic. This caused anxiety among many hayfever sufferers, who are experiencing symptoms that they think could

Back pain: Superman stretch helps with pain in the back especially in the lower regions |

With many Britons now working remotely and not having the correct equipment including an office chair, backache has become a reality. Pain in the back can negatively affect one’s life greatly and with the need to ease pressure off the NHS,   finding ways

Coronavirus symptoms: Signs of COVID-19 that require toilet swap include diarrhoea poo |

Coronavirus is an infectious disease which has been confirmed in more than one million individuals across the world. Those with diarrhoea – a sign of COVID-19 – must consider using a separate bathroom to the rest of the family, it’s

Coronavirus tips: Breathing technique could alleviate symptoms |

COVID-19 reports make for harrowing reading, with patients recounting the gruelling stages of their symptoms. More often than not, the symptoms involve intense coughing episodes and trouble breathing. This is because COVID-19 is a respiratory infection so the lungs are

Coronavirus symptoms: First signs of the illness may appear when you go to the toilet – di |

Coronavirus has infected 41,903 Britons. Symptoms of the disease include a fever and a new, continuous cough. But what’s the first sign of the illness that may appear in the bog bowl? According to a new study, published in The

Toxic lead removed from Paris schools after Notre Dame fire

Workers in full protective gear began Thursday to decontaminate some Paris schools tested with unsafe levels of lead following the blaze at the Notre Dame Cathedral, as part of efforts to protect children from risks of lead poisoning. Paris authorities

DuoCAR-T cells found to be effective against HIV in human mouse models

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S., working with biotech firm Lentigen, has found that duoCAR-T cells they created were effective against HIV in human mouse models. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational

Can major surgeries cause a long-term 'brain drain'?

(HealthDay)—Before any surgery, you typically hear warnings about risks like bleeding and infection, but new research suggests that problems with thinking or memory can often follow a major procedure. The study found that people who had surgery had an increased

Understanding gun violence and mass shootings

Public mass shootings, once a rare event, now occur with shocking frequency in the United States. According to the Washington Post, four or more people are killed in this horrific manner every 47 days. The most recent mass shootings, in

Gene protective against fruit fly heat-induced seizures may explain some human seizures

Researchers identified a gene in fruit flies that helps prevent the hyperexcitability of specific neurons that trigger seizures. In humans, mutations in the gene may be linked to seizures associated with Long QT Syndrome. A research team led by Yehuda

New research points to potential therapy for abnormal touch sensitivity in autism spectrum disorders

The inability to tolerate light touch is a telltale feature of autism and one of the disorder’s many perplexing symptoms. It has defied treatment, and its precise origins have remained somewhat of a mystery. Now a study led by investigators

Bringing cancer medication safely to its destination

Treating cancer more selectively and more effectively—this could be achieved with an innovative technology developed by teams of researchers at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU). The process transforms proteins and antibodies into stable, highly

Lassa virus' soft spot revealed

As this year’s Lassa fever outbreak in Nigeria is finally ebbing, the total tally came to more than 600 infected people, one-quarter of them dead. Thousands more die each year, uncounted in rural villages throughout West Africa. With an annual

Home births as safe as hospital births: International study

A large international study led by McMaster University shows that low risk pregnant women who intend to give birth at home have no increased chance of the baby’s perinatal or neonatal death compared to other low risk women who intend

Combination targeted therapy may offer hope to infants with a deadly type of leukemia

City of Hope researchers have identified a potential combination targeted therapy for a deadly type of leukemia found in some infants, a population too young to receive full-blown chemotherapy. Called “mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL),”